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The Beer Circle » Brew It Yourself, Fruit / Vegetable Beer » Novice Homebrewer: Next of pumpKIN Review

Novice Homebrewer: Next of pumpKIN Review

I hope that you read my post on brewing my pumpkin ale, Next of pumpKIN. Here is the tasting review. I had decent expectations going in, but I did also expect some shortcomings due to the amount of pumpkin that remained in the beer since it came out of the muslin bag. Let’s just say I was more than pleased with the results.

Lincoln Abbey Next of pumpKIN
Appearancewww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.com
The beer pours a dark amber color with some orange hues and a frothy beige colored head that lingers for a while and leaves a light lacing on the glass. If you’ve seen other amber ales that have been modified to include pumpkin, it looks similar to them.
Aromawww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.com
The aroma consists of pumpkin, nutmeg, cinnamon, vanilla, and molasses. It has a nice pumpkin pie smell to it, which is what I was trying to accomplish. The nutmeg and cinnamon do not overpower the nostrils, a welcome trait of the beer.
Tastewww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.com
The taste is smooth and rounded with pumpkin and vanilla on the front end before it dries out a little bit with cinnamon, nutmeg, and allspice. Some molasses sweetens up the finish so it doesn’t dry out the mouth too much. It definitely has the pumpkin pie experience that I love in pumpkin beers without being too spiced or dry.
Mouthfeel/Drinkabilitywww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.com
For the alcohol content, this beer is pretty easy to drink. I chalk that up to the massive amount of pumpkin in this beer and the fact it is a dessert-like beverage. As for mouthfeel, it does have a little bit of a chalky-ness to it due to my inability to filter out all of the pumpkin particles. I don’t mind it, but someone might.
Valuewww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.com
Here’s where I ran in to a conundrum. When writing the post about brewing the beer, I was absolutely disappointed in only yielding 35 bottles of this beer. However, following the tasting of the beer and writing this post, I would say that it was absolutely worth the money I spent to make it. All in all, I would estimate it cost me about $2.25 per bottle to make this beer.
Overallwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.com
I was impressed with how my pumpkin ale came out with a nice pumpkin sweetness and not overdone on the spices. It was better than expected, especially after the one muslin bag came out of the boil pot empty. I would absolutely make this beer again even though working with the pumpkin was a bit of a pain in the ass.

Beer Stats
Style: Fruit/Vegetable Beer
Serving: Bottle
Size: 12oz
ABV: 7.80%
BA Score: N/A
RB Score: N/A

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Written by Jeff Kupko

Jeff is a traffic engineer that loves his beer, and especially loves trying new beer. As a student at the University of Pittsburgh, Yuengling was a staple and the beginnings of liking something better than fizzy yellow water. This has evolved into an entire hobby, with Jeff keeping a blog of all of the beers he tries. Vacations most certainly involve at least one brewery or bottle shop visit to gather a region’s coveted fruits. Now, Jeff has ventured into homebrewing, and there is probably no saving him from being engulfed entirely by beer. While Imperial Stouts and IPAs rank highest in Jeff’s eyes, sours are sneaking up on those styles, and Jeff loves to try all different styles. Find Jeff Kupko on Google Plus

Filed under: Brew It Yourself, Fruit / Vegetable Beer · Tags: , , ,